Re: Isolation

It’s easy to talk about SOLID principles, design patterns, testing, moral expectations, self responsibility, and any other guide lines for a better world. Sometimes it’s even easy to adhere to those ideas, to put them in practice, no matter how may times some people repeat “there wasn’t/isn’t time”.

Although, there are situations that really stand against all best practices, like big legacy products which are already on the market, used by many clients, developed by many people who are managed very strict, in order to maintain… order. Or you need to get fast on the market.

The minimum that can be done is isolation. The least you can do is to throw your code in its own corner and use it only from there, then go back to change it whenever you want, without fear, with minimum cost and risk.

Isolation

Big fan of isolation here, from code libraries to apps environments.

Code should be organized in reusable and extensible units (package, library, component), isolated from other units, the interaction between them being made on APIs well described by a contract. Also, they should be easily extensible.

Apps should live in isolated environments. I’m talking about servers, virtual machines, and containers. If different services run on the same machine, you can isolate them using containers. As such, you can safely and independently deploy, make upgrades, balance traffic, move over different machines.
If you must work directly in the container (maybe perform some upgrade), and something goes wrong, you just restart the container from the original image.

I remember having some issues upgrading a Python package in an old production environment. The attempted upgrades just crashed. I knew the service could stay offline for a while, but I had to put it back up. As other services were running on that machine, I didn’t want to interfere with them. So I just set up a new environment for the Python app inside a Docker container, installed it from scratch, and it was up again.

Isolation also suites well legacy apps. You can just throw everything inside a container, and never be afraid of moving between machines, interfering with other services, or breaking things.